The Things I see…

the following is a collection of images, collected over the last Open House weekend,  last November, 4-5 months ago,  from various walks, talks, visits and peregrinations during that lovely weekend…     A few of these i’ll post on at some future point, but for now perhaps the images speak better for themselves.   Taken together, they help explain why we love this city,  and love learning about it and exploring it…

We start with the interior of private house, beautifully restored, (the 2 pictures just below)   

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Above:  from a private house 1, post-restoration, North city Centre.

Below, pictures,then we move to an exhibition by architects, staged in a semi-derelict house, on the same street.mostly featuring an exhibition of conceptual architectural models & projects. Different private house, pre-restoration, but same street,  North city Centre.

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I especially liked this model, (above, & below)   -the shifting parallax, & the lovely stark minimalism of it.  I’m quite a fan of minimal artworks, particularly from that amazing generation of American artists from the late 60s, 70s and on.  (Gordon Mata-Clark; Robert Morris,, Michael Heizer, Robert Smithson, Robert Oppenheimer, Richard Serra etc, a very varied bunch I know but anyway…)   Anything that teaches us to appreciate rhythms or series or repetitions in sculpture or architecture;  even in a pile of building materials;  or in a multistory car-park,  seems like good news to me.  

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above, detail, same model. 

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Actually, this last picture (above)  is just a part of an interior wall inside the the house, with the old, damp plaster stripped off to leave the old Georgian-era wall-structure exposed.  I admit, I thought for a bit it was some sort of installation, and so spent 20-minutes gawping at it.  You’d think I’d be embarrassed when I realized it was just a wall.  But you’d be wrong, that just made me even happier.  Yep, easily pleased…    But you know why.  

Below, more models, maps and displays from the exhibition. 

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Loved this lace-like map too, (above)  with the city blocks cut out, to leave  just the roads & streets remaining.  I’ve a wonderful art piece, a map, very like this in my own home, made by & bought from a young Spanish artist a few years back.  One of my most treasured things.  

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Dubliners will instantly recognise this building represented above, (in the two previous pictures (above).   For over seas readers, the  model represents our (state) Central Bank,  on Dame Street,here in Dublin, on the edge or cusp of Temple Bar.  

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As you gather, the old, battered house was the perfect backdrop, in fact, more than that, it was every bit as much the star of the show as any of the models.

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I was going to write more in this post, post more pictures-  other images, buildings; trees; plaques; window frames; shadows of leaves, branches & old metal work, cast on old school walls.  But perhaps I’ll leave it here.   Sometimes less is more.

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End.  

10 thoughts on “The Things I see…

  1. I love your pictures of the little details that often get overlooked. The wall of yours with the plaster ripped off looks very much like our ceilings. Did they put horse hair in the plaster to consolidate it?

    1. Hi Jane, and thank you. You know I’d forgotten that detail, (my sister is the real expert in 18th & 19th century building & materials) But, now you mention it I believe yes, that they did use horse hair. I shall check with my expert and get back to you on that. Delighted you like the photos. I love the play of light across the old plaster & paint. There is something magical about 18th century houses, and oddly enough I don’t like them too pristine & restored. In fact, I almost think the more decrepit, the better.

      1. I forgot to mention the old plaster effect. I much prefer that lived in look to tarted up restored jobs. The people who had this house before us had just got to the stage of stripping down to the old plaster in our bedroom. We decided to leave it like that, sort of faintly mottled, you know? It looks lovely with a couple of pictures and a bit of sunlight across it.

  2. Great collection of images! I like the concept of this post showing the reconstruction in progress, historic references and an exhibit that encourages one to see art in a modern way everywhere. Can’t wait to see more on the old metal work. I love architectural details and the process of aging on everyday objects.

  3. Dear Aaron! I haven’t been able to stop thinking about this beautiful nod to architectural details since I spotted yesterday. Oh. My. I keep scrolling up and down the post. For the love of mana, the details are exactly why I treasure old houses and buildings. More, please! Perhaps you’ll create a part II with more photographs. I also love the wall structure and the lace-like map. Bravo!! Theadora (The top two photographs are so lovely.)

    1. ha, not a problem (name spelling) Story of my life, really. (and I blame my parents) Glad you enjoyed. May post more in future on this. But lots more to say about Dublin. Anyway, delighted..
      -Arran.

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